#37

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Re: #37

Postby Cliff » Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:33 pm

Tom

Looking at the stern bulkhead--is there a waterproof hatch?
Cliff
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Re: #37

Postby tomodda » Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:53 pm

Cliff:

>>I imagine you have metal brackets at the seat thwart connection held on with wood screws. Any way to show this connection?

Those connections to the bracket were the worst part of this whole project, I'll snap a photo and then whine to you about why it was such a PITA.

>>Looking at the stern bulkhead--is there a waterproof hatch?

Hardly! From the previous owner, I got a plywood sheet with a strip of 1/2x wood framing, falling apart from water damage. It screws over the hatch, utterly useless. Another winter-time project for me, I'm actually thinking of opening it up more, like the newer DS1's. My thinking is that I don't want to put a lot of weight that far aft and I want any water that gets in there to drain out fast. Good place to toss fenders, spare cushions, etc.. light, waterproof stuff. No waterproof hatch needed. Well, I'll take a snapshot of the sh*tty original hatch, just to scare you :)

Tom
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Re: #37

Postby tomodda » Thu Oct 25, 2018 10:18 pm

Hi Cliff!

Apologies for the delay in posting pics, it's been one of those weeks.....

So, here's a quick snap of the aft "hatch", it's actually just a rectangle of fiberglass, with a wood frame, screws to the hole in the aft bulkhead:

IMG_20181023_131417-640x480.jpg
hatch cover
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Here's the bracket connecting the seat to the thwarts. I took this photo by shoving the camera down there and clicking, I wasn't up to contorting myself in the bilges again (that's my wrist over on the left!). Suffice to say that this is an extreme close-up, but the dimensions are about 10" x 10" in an L-shape:

IMG_20181023_131451-800x600.jpg
Seat Bracket
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The bottom of this photo is the thwart-side, top are the seats. The bronze screws go into the thwarts (there's one more screw outside the frame of this photo) and the stainless ones go into the seat. No reason for the different screws, it's just what i had on hand. Seen from above (you can barely see the metal between the planks):

IMG_20181023_131542-800x600.jpg
From Above
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The thwarts are to the right in this photo.

That's it! Happy to answer any questions, but the connection is pretty straightforward. It's strong enough along with the cleats along the side walls that I don't need additional under-seat brackets, giving me a nice sweep of extra storage space. Dunno how I'm going to use it yet :)

Tom
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Re: #37

Postby tomodda » Thu Nov 01, 2018 10:58 pm

Yay! Inaugural sail was today! I went solo, so everything took twice as long to rig/unrig, but I had a wonderful first sail. She handled very well, put up with my newbie-to-Daysailers mistakes, and responded smartly to the lightest touch on the helm or sheets. Of course, the beautiful 10 knot breeze I started out with quickly died to random puffs, but that was fine for my "shake-down cruise." With the ratchet blocks that GL reccomended, I could sail her with main and jib sheets in one hand, tiller in the other. Somehow I managed to play the sheets in and out just with my fingers, or quickly swapping one sheet to my tiller hand if I had to make larger adjustments. No problem, although I'm sure it would be more complicated in a real breeze. My only real problem is that sitting abaft the center thwart I couldn't really see the jib on any point of sail. I did ok tending the jib by feel and sound and what I could see of the luff (lower 3 feet), but I need to ponder on how to single-hand this boat. Bottom line, a pleasant day of hookey from work, and I see why you folks are so in love with these little daysailers!
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Re: #37

Postby GreenLake » Fri Nov 02, 2018 12:47 pm

I find that holding main and jib in one hand I can adjust both independently by moving my hand not just in/out for total tension, but also sideways to change relative tension. Works well in the kinds of wind you encountered.

Seating position: you'll want to sit forward as much as you can. Makes your boat sail faster in light winds and you get to see your jib tell tales.

I always rig a bungee across the boat, with another loop of thinner bungee cord around it and the tiller. That tends to keep the tiller at whatever position I let it go, without having to lock/unlock anything. Works like a charm when I temporarily need a free hand.

Additional benefit: in very light winds, I can let go the tiller and only nudge it occasionally as needed. If I hold on to it, I would inevitably move it unintentionally. This reduction in tiller movement translates to better boat speed in those conditions. The difference can be amazing. I recall a local race where I drifted in this mode in dying winds, sitting absolutely still, for the last half hour of the race to make 4th place and become the last boat finishing within the time limit.

Likewise, sailing downwind, I can fly a spinnaker and in moderate conditions, the boat will actually sail better (the bungee isn't tempted to "anticipate" course changes, so I end up with a straighter course). It's amazingly hard to be that steady.

Drawback: interferes with tiller feedback a bit as you are overcoming the pull of the bungee as well as the water pressure on the rudder.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: #37

Postby tomodda » Fri Nov 02, 2018 8:45 pm

Thank you for the tips, GreenLake!

Yes, I think I was doing lateral and in/out pulls on the two sheets in my hand, like you described. All I know is that it felt very easy and natural, although it wont be so easy in a a "real" wind.

I sat as far forward as I could, on the forward thwart or up on the sidedecks about 16 inches behind the cuddy. I'm sailing with a buddy tomorrow and will take a closer look at why I can't see the jib. By the way, my jib doesn't have tell-tales, I need to get some. In the meantime, I just watched to see if the luff looked "unhappy" or shuddered.

Tomorrow, I'm also bringing a longer bungee cord so I can set up your tiller system. For yesterday's light winds, I was eventually able to just let the tiller rub against the aft coaming and that was enough to hold it. Otherwise, I was steering with my tiller extension and holding it loosely - very aware of the inefficiencies of over-steering. Dad grumbling at me about "fishtail wake!" when I was a kid :roll:

Looking forward to flying a chute one day. I picked one up off of craigslist for $75, made by Ulmer, no less! I need to rig a spin' pole, I'm going to copy your bamboo-and-glass idea. Yet another project..... All good. (Although I have a nice light piece of spruce that I might use)

Thanks again!
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Re: #37

Postby GreenLake » Sat Nov 03, 2018 1:29 pm

Spin pole - don't underestimate the loads. Mostly compression, but can be a bit of bending as well. Bamboo has the obvious advantage of being hollow: all material is where it adds the most strength, but perhaps your spruce might work. Should be good for compression, but I'll let you find out how much bending it can take. Epoxy sealed and with a layer of very thin cloth, it would become so much more durable with regards to weather.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Winter Progress

Postby tomodda » Tue Feb 19, 2019 10:49 pm

Been a long, cold, mostly rainy winter here in NC. As I've documented a bit in the repairs section of this forum, my friend has been kind enough to loan my his small barn for the winter and I've been painting (and sanding, and filling, and sanding some more). 99% of the folks on this forum are gonna hate my color choice, but it's actually pretty traditional, just not for a O'Day Daysailer... Anyway, a before pic, my last sail of the year and note the Electric Paddle hung on the stern:

FallsSail.jpg
Falls Lake
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For the topsides, I decided to go with a buff/tan color to avoid being blinded by white decks in our Carolina summer sun. Likewise, anything dark would burn my butt when sitting out on the side decks, so tan it was. Hull is not painted yet in this pic:

Topsides.jpg
Topsides painted
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The rest are just complementary colors - Seafoam Green for the hull, and I LIKE red :). Anyway, here's the hull, flipped over and first coat of Seafoam applied (it's not quite as saturated in real life, the lighting was bad):

hull.jpg
Flipped Hull Painted
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You'll have to use your imagination to see it all together, but here's where I stole the idea for these colors, a maniac/genius/adventurer named Howard Rice:

http://thepocketyacht.blogspot.com/2018 ... icial.html

Fascinating story, and I love the John Welsford SCAMP, just not enough to build one and sail to Patagonia! My local lake will do fine, thank you.... After a bit of research, I bought the same paint that Mr Rice did, Marine Enamel from Kirby Paints in Massachusetts. Great company - answered my many questions via phone, kept my prices reasonable, and are an all-around pleasure to deal with.

Anyway, tons of work left to do, starting with another hull sanding and two more coats of paint. Weather is NOT co-operating, I prefer to paint when it's over 50F and not pouring rain. But, we're getting there. I smell Spring...

Tom
Last edited by tomodda on Wed Feb 20, 2019 7:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: #37

Postby Cliff » Wed Feb 20, 2019 6:39 pm

Very nice!!
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Re: #37

Postby GreenLake » Thu Feb 21, 2019 2:06 am

+1!
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: #37

Postby tomodda » Thu Feb 21, 2019 7:16 am

Thank you, guys! I just can't wait to get back out there and bash my new paint job against the local rocks and pilings! :mrgreen:
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Re: #37

Postby GreenLake » Thu Feb 21, 2019 4:16 pm

Curious about the teak handholds on the cuddy deck. Were those original?

They certainly make the boat look like a "big" boat, but I can't really see anyone using them. (Mast and shrouds are so much more convenient places to hold on to when going forward - and yes, someone is always going forward on my boat ;) )
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: #37

Postby tomodda » Thu Feb 21, 2019 7:30 pm

Hi GL.

Don't know if they are 1958, made-in-Marscott original, I doubt it. They came with the boat when I bought her, so I figured that I may as well keep them - and sand/oil them, they looked terrible before. And you are right, so far they haven't really been useful for going forward, but they are nice to hold onto when sitting up against the cuddy. I also used the port handrail to help jury-rig my down-haul, you'll see it in first pic. But overall, their purpose is to look "boaty". ARRRRrrrrrrr :lol:
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Re: #37

Postby GreenLake » Fri Feb 22, 2019 2:33 am

Look "boaty", that they do!
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: #37

Postby tomodda » Mon Mar 11, 2019 9:40 am

Progress!

Most of it invisible to naked eye - more coats of paint, more sanding, more freezing my butt off in this unusually cold North Carolina winter. But, finally, something you all can see - waterline stripe!

IMG_20190309_200142.jpg
Waterline Stripe 1
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Even with the line molded into the hull, this was a royal pain in the "transom" to mask off. But now that it's done, let's admire it from all angles :)

IMG_20190309_200222.jpg
Waterline Stripe 2
IMG_20190309_200222.jpg (129 KiB) Viewed 1325 times


Ahem, yes, there's a roller mark that you'll see in the reflection right above the stripe. Dammit, I got careless towards the end on my last coat. More sanding, more painting :(

Tom the Almost-Perfectionist
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