Rowing instructions

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Re: Rowing instructions

Postby jeadstx » Sat Jan 21, 2017 10:41 pm

My original oars were 7' long. Too short, but I was still able to row the boat. My new oars are 8.5' long, work better. Since I store them in the cockpit along the base of the seats, I didn't want them any longer.

John
1976 Day Sailer II, #8075 - Completed the 2011, 2012, and 2013 Texas 200
1952 Beetle Boat Swan Catboat
Early Rhodes 19
1973 Mariner 2+2, #2607 - Completed 2014, 2015 and 2016 Texas 200
1969 Day Sailer I, #3229
Fleet 135; Canyon Lake, Texas
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Re: Rowing instructions

Postby GreenLake » Sun Jan 22, 2017 3:52 am

jeadstx wrote:My original oars were 7' long. Too short, but I was still able to row the boat. My new oars are 8.5' long, work better. Since I store them in the cockpit along the base of the seats, I didn't want them any longer.


Having oars you can't stow is certainly not practical. The formula would seem to suggest in that case to move the oarlocks a bit inboard to make them conform to the standard ratio.

Getting curious and looking around the web for this a bit, I found one person mentioning that the formula gives you oars that are "too short, if you are strong or your boat is fast". The DS is too wide to be "fast"; so definitely not a cause to go for anything different than that 7/25 ratio for the inboard loom. (I doubt that anyone who keeps oars as "occasional" propulsion, and doesn't have a rowing machine in the basement, would be "strong" in rowing terms).

On another site, people reported the need to re-jigger their rowing setup to make it work for them. In particular, they were adjusting the height of the oarlocks.

The width between the coamings on a DS seems to match what I can find for specifications on rowing rigs elsewhere. I suspect that if you are taller you might want a bit wider base, because your stroke would be longer. Fascinating topic.
(Edit: the standard spread is usually described in the context where people row with sliding seats. Interesting question whether not having a sliding seat means that a narrower spread would be better).
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Rowing instructions

Postby jeadstx » Sun Jan 22, 2017 5:00 am

As mentioned I was able to row fairly efficiently even with the 7' oars. The new oars I got have a slightly larger blade that seems to really help. My seating position has been the same with both length oars. My oarlocks (on the DS II) are located on the outside top of the coaming/rail. Being able to stow the oars was an important factor for me in my oar length selection. Oars are not intended as my main propulsion on the DS II. Storing the oars at the base of the cockpit seat on the decking is a good place as it does not interfere with sailing and does not foul lines or feet. I originally stored the oars along the side deck to get them out of the cockpit, this arrangement however kept snagging the jib sheets.

There is an article on the internet (somewhere) about an O'Day Mariner being outfitted with 2 rowing stations with sliding seats and the sailing hardware (including mast and boom) removed. They kept the centerboard and rudder. The individuals that did this modification wanted to use the boat to row 12,000 miles. I've seen pictures of the boat being rowed. Unfortunately their trip was cut short (they got about 800 miles) when they choose jagged rocks to beach the boat on and the hull was holed.

John
1976 Day Sailer II, #8075 - Completed the 2011, 2012, and 2013 Texas 200
1952 Beetle Boat Swan Catboat
Early Rhodes 19
1973 Mariner 2+2, #2607 - Completed 2014, 2015 and 2016 Texas 200
1969 Day Sailer I, #3229
Fleet 135; Canyon Lake, Texas
jeadstx
 
Posts: 1216
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 11:10 am
Location: Dripping Springs, Tx

Re: Rowing instructions

Postby 1987DSPrecision » Mon Jan 23, 2017 10:30 pm

I think the Shaw and Tenney formula is for an "ideal" rowing situation on fine rowing craft. Obviously our boats aren't ideal or necessarily considered a fine rowing craft.
However, I think it is helpful in trying to determine placement.

The other consideration is that most rowers, or people that predominantly spend their time rowing, are looking for the handle to cross in front of them (2inches seems right) whereas on the sailboat that gets rowed occasionally you would have more flexibility and maneuverability with a little room in between them.
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Re: Rowing instructions

Postby talbot » Mon Feb 20, 2017 2:49 am

The 8.5' oar length for a DS II is pretty much dictated by the length of the cockpit. A new-style DS I will have a shorter cockpit sole, so you either have to muscle along with shorter oars, or you lash them on the deck, where they may interfere with running rigging and with hiking out. The context for most of us is that the oars are annoying clutter most of the time. We want them as inobtrusive as possible. For most of us, if being becalmed is a serious issue (like, we might be swept out to sea), we are using motors. So I would get the longest oars you can store without compromising your sailing.

The priorities might be different if the oars are critical. In that case, I would get the length you need to propel the boat, and figure out how to store them (let us know). I would also replace my lightweight ash oars with aluminum Carlisles, like the whitewater rafters use.
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Re: Rowing instructions

Postby Kylo » Sat Aug 26, 2017 11:36 pm

Hey jeadstx I was wondering what you kind of oarlocks you use with the heavy duty aluminum oars you have? I picked up some second hand Carlisles recently and am needing some oarlocks. Found quite a few that will work, but the problem is finding the 5/8 sockets to go with them. I'd like to mount them the way talbot did, but only come up with 1/2" shanks which aren't compatible with heavy duty oarlocks.
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Re: Rowing instructions

Postby Kylo » Sat Aug 26, 2017 11:48 pm

All I've found that is 5/8 is a Stearns heavy duty oarlock socket at L&M Fleet Supply. The price is right but I don't think it will stand up to the weather for long.
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Re: Rowing instructions

Postby GreenLake » Sun Aug 27, 2017 2:39 am

jeadstx died on July 11, 2017.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Rowing instructions

Postby talbot » Sun Aug 27, 2017 3:41 am

I had no idea. John made some great contributions to sailing.
I only sailed with him once, but we had a great time. I suppose we'll figure out the answers to oarlock fittings and all the other things he could advise about. But we'll mutter, this would have been easier if we could have just asked John.
I found his obituary at http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/states ... =186084087

--Talbot
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Re: Rowing instructions

Postby Kylo » Sun Aug 27, 2017 1:53 pm

So sorry to hear about this, RIP John aka jeadstx.
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Re: Rowing instructions

Postby GreenLake » Sun Aug 27, 2017 5:44 pm

Kylo wrote:So sorry to hear about this, RIP John aka jeadstx.


More here: RIP John E. Alesch
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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