Sideways slop in centerboard, DS1, cure

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Sideways slop in centerboard, DS1, cure

Postby Guest » Tue Nov 19, 2002 6:26 pm

When I got my DS1 (#4480)last year I noticed a lot of sideways play in the centerboard. It would "clunk around" a lot. Found a number of references to the same problem on this discussion group and ways to fix it, which amounted to putting shims on either side of the centerboard. I did that and it's worked fine.

The purpose of this post is to mention the material I used--- 1/8" thick sheet of PVC type 1 "plastic". PVC= poly vinyl cloride (I think!). The same stuff that PVC piping is made from. It won't ever absorb any water. The local hardware store was able to order a sheet. 2'x4' sheet was about $25 if I remember right. That's plenty of material to make 2 shims, one for each side of the centerboard. Used a piece of cardboard to make a template of approximately the right size and hole location. Installed the shims without having to remove the centerboard, just supported it while having the handle out.

steve parsons (saabdrver-at-aol.com)
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Postby Roger » Tue Nov 19, 2002 9:54 pm

How big did you make these shims? I sounds from your post that you lined both sides of the inside of the centerboard trunk, which would certainly solve the problem, but my suspicion is that you made large washers. How big were the washers?

My other question is about the sheet of pvc that you bought. Is this stuff fairly flexible or quite stiff? Also what color is it? Does it come in other colors? I have to replace the hatch and was wondering if this stuff would meet spec for the job.
Roger
 
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Postby Guest » Wed Nov 20, 2002 10:38 am

The shims are approximately 15.5"x 12", with the 15.5 length being vertical. This is about the inside depth of the centerboard trunk, which puts the bottom of the shim right at the bottom of the boat and gives extra sideways support to the board when it's all the way down. the rectangler shape keeps the shims from rotating with the board. The upper front corner needs to be rounded off some (about 1" radius) to make shim fit properly into the trunk.

The material is stiff without being brittle. I cut it with a jig saw. I might be availiable in thicknesses greater then 1/8".

steve parsons (saabdrver-at-aol.com)
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Postby Roger » Wed Nov 20, 2002 2:41 pm

Thanks for that info re the pvc sheeting. One final question. In what kind of store did you get it and what is it typically used for? What kind of supplier where would I find this sort of thing, a glass supplier, lumber yard, building supplies place etc.?
Roger
 
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Joined: Sat May 08, 2004 6:36 pm
Location: Ninette Manitoba

Postby Guest » Wed Nov 20, 2002 5:30 pm

I got the sheet from our neighborhood hardware store...Mom & Pop type. The owner was very knowledgable about where to inquire about such stuff and ordered it special. Unfortunately he had a bad heart and passed away a couple months ago (at only 45 years old). I don't believe the person there now would know, but I'll check next time I'm there. I'm not sure what it would have been used for "officiallY". Perhaps just ask around at local hardware stores. A sticker on the sheet said "PVC type 1", but nothing else of significance. That may mean there are other types of PVC, but don't know what differences there'd be. Maybe try a search on the internet.

steve parsons (saabdrver-at-aol.com)
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Postby Guest » Fri Nov 22, 2002 9:01 am

If you can not find PVC sheeting available check out UHMW (ultra high molecular weight) plastic sheet. It is used extensively in industry for abrasion resistant surfacing of mechanical parts. It has a very low coefficient of friction (slick stuff) and can be cut/shaped with woodworking tools. It is available in sizes up to 4'X8' and a wide variety of thicknesses. One source for UHMW plastic sheeting is McMaster Carr industrial supply - sales desk (404)346-7000

Calvin Trotter (calvin.g.trotter-at-saint-gobain.com)
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Postby Peter McMinn » Sat Nov 23, 2002 8:58 pm

I intend to make the same improvement on my own c-board. I've read in other parts of this forum that formica has also been used. My inclination is that PVC might be better as it's not as brittle, not as apt to break up over time. OTH, this amount of formica, is quite a bit cheaper, if not free. Perhaps some of those who've shimmed their boards with formica can chime in with their experience.
Peter McMinn
 
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Postby Guest » Sun Nov 24, 2002 11:14 am

Peter, I shimed my centerboard with formica, and had no problems with the it. I used pieces 6" square with a hole in the center. One on each side. Then contact cement to hold them in place, while installing the center board. A permenant bond is not required. The handle will hold them in place once they are installed. I know several other DS owners who used this method.

Ed Hutchinson

Ed Hutchinson (edhutchinson-at-worldnet.att.com)
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