Cuddy roof

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Cuddy roof

Postby Peter McMinn » Thu Jan 23, 2003 12:21 am

The cuddy roof of my DS1 has seen some forty years of stomping and general foredeck abuse. Consequently, the aft edge is a little droopy; more significantly though, the upper corners of port and starboard are showing stress fractures.
I intend to brace the roof back into shape, then glass a structural bar across the underside of the cuddy roof--thinking of 1-1/2" pvc piping--to restore the original integrity of structure.
What say ye? Anyone attempted something similar?
Peter McMinn
 
Posts: 259
Joined: Mon May 10, 2004 3:41 pm
Location: Portland, OR

Postby Roger » Thu Jan 23, 2003 6:32 pm

An arc shaped chunk of wood glassed in against the inner aft roof/cuddy opening may structurally give you more stiffness than a round tube in the same position. I would assume that the tube would only touch the inner roof and inner aft cuddy opening along a narrow line where the edge of the tube contacts these sections, whereas a piece of ash, cut in an arc to match the underside of the cuddy roof, lets say 3/4 inch thick by 2 inches tall and running the span of the width of the cuddy roof, glassed in, would have significantly more contact with the existing structure, and may also be asthetically more pleasing than a tube. If you check the inside of your cuddy further forward there is a similar stiffener. I can post a picture to the gallery to show you this piece in case your boat did not have one of these.
Roger
 
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Joined: Sat May 08, 2004 6:36 pm
Location: Ninette Manitoba

Postby Peter McMinn » Tue Mar 04, 2003 5:33 pm

Job complete, or nearly.
First, I used an hydrolic jack to push the roof into proper form, and keep it there throughout the repair.
Instead of using PVC, I bandsawed the beam out of 2X6 cedar, as this material lends itelf well to custom shaping. With a beltsander, I rounded the low side to a 5/8" radius and sealed it all with epoxy resin. Then, using props, I epoxied the arched, 2" beam to the sanded surface--about 8 inches forward of the cuddy crown. I then used a heavy mixture of resin and microballoons (silica, even fine sawdust, will work) to build up fillets along the inside corner where the beam meets the ceiling.
After this set up, I sanded everything to conformity and glassed up two layers of cloth, overlapped at the crown, making four layers over about 1'.5" in the middle. I got my brother to help me handle the wet cloth strips which were about three feet in length. Squeegeed the bubbles and wrinkels, let it harden.
Next, I plan to add vertical FG support port & starboard with a couple of layers conforming to the end of the beam.
Many latex gloves later, the improvement to the cuddy roof is remarkable--it's very strong now, with the added support not weighing more than a few pounds. I think the stiffer topsides might add to a stiffer rig, too. At any rate, the roof should be good for another 40 years of spinnaker sets.
Peter McMinn
 
Posts: 259
Joined: Mon May 10, 2004 3:41 pm
Location: Portland, OR

Postby Roger » Wed Mar 05, 2003 12:10 am

I assume from your discription that you were gluing to the underside of the cuddy. Assumming also that you did this with the boat in an upright aspect, how did you prevent droop of the cloth as you applied it to the member, or did it have enough viscosity, not to droop?
Roger
 
Posts: 853
Joined: Sat May 08, 2004 6:36 pm
Location: Ninette Manitoba


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