Let's Fix Anhinga! Part 2: The Centerboard

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Let's Fix Anhinga! Part 2: The Centerboard

Postby Guest » Mon Sep 08, 1997 12:00 am

<p>This image shows the general condition of the bottom of the boat as well as the centerboard:</p><p><a href="/daysailer/repair/images/centerboard_lg.jpg"><img src="/daysailer/repair/images/centerboard_sm.jpg" alt="Centerboard and bottom of hull" border="1" width="174" height="95"></a> (click for a larger image)</p><p>What is the material flaking off the centerboard and how should I replace it? Do I need to remove the centerboard to do this? If so, how do I remove the centerboard?</p>

Mike Boone (BooneDocks-at-kagi.com)
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Tue Dec 02, 1997 1:00 am

To remove that centerboard:<OL><LI>The best position for the boat is on its side (roll it on the beach or your lawn). Otherwise, you will need at least enough room to drop the board out and you will need someone to lower it out.</LI><LI>Remove the two inspection ports on either side of the centerboard trunk to expose the bolt that the centerboard pivots on.</LI><LI>Remove the nut on the pivot bolt and remove the bolt. If the boat is not on its side (or upside down) be sure that there is someone to catch the board.</LI><LI>Remove the control cables/lines that are connected to the board, note how they were connected. It may be simpler, depending on your setup (there were several different setups), to leave the control lines connected to the board. Attach messenger lines to the ends before pulling them through to make installation easier.</LI></OL>When installing, smear the gaskets with SuperLube (doesn't attack the rubber) and tighten moderately. After launching, check through the inspection ports for leaks and tighten as needed.

Bob Lemaire (rlemaire-at-mediaone.com)
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Sat Dec 13, 1997 1:00 am

The previous reply refers to a DS II centerboard configuration.

If you have a DS I then you need to unbolt the plate on the starboard side of the CB trunk that holds the handle (3 bolts).

Remove the plate and pull out the handle.

Form your picture it looks like the head of the board hangs below the hull and beaching the boat has worn off the gelcoat.

Not really anything to worry about if the board looks intact otherwise.

You could mix up some epoxy filler and smear a thin coat over the worn areas. I did that to repair some dings on the lower end of my board that resulted from submerged rock hits.

John Hoffman (hoffman-at-hey.net)
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Sun Mar 08, 1998 1:00 am

While I don't intend to rebuild my centerboard from scratch at this point, there's a lot of great information in this article by Dave Misunas.

CENTER BOARDS and DAY SAILERS at <A HREF='http://www.convergant.com/daysailer/articles/ds_cntbrd_build.htm'>http://www.convergant.com/daysailer/articles/ds_cntbrd_build.htm</A>.

This article details how to build a complete centerboard from scratch out of wood, and then how to coat it later with a layer of fiberglass.

Mike Boone (boonedocks-at-kagi.com)
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Sun Mar 29, 1998 1:00 am

<I>
To remove that centerboard (on DS II):
2) Remove the two inspection ports on either side of the centerboard trunk to expose the bolt that the centerboard pivots on.
</I>
I was considering doing this on my boat yesterday, but my centerboard trunk has <em>no</em> way of removing anything, at least that's what it looks like from the cockpit. The centerboard trunk is one big molded section of fiberglass, with no apparent seams or bolts to gain access to the board itself.

So I looked on the bottom. I admit I didn't get a good view since the boat is still on the trailer, but I can't see any means to access the centerboard from there either.

There's got to be a way to get to the darn thing, but it's not obvious to me. Any ideas?

Mike Boone (boonedocks-at-kagi.com)
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Mon Mar 30, 1998 1:00 am

The inspection ports should be on the bottom of your cockpit. Two of them on either side of the centerboard trunk. This information is based on my 1975 DSII.

I dropped the centerboard by raising the boat off of the trailer with overhead mounted winches. I had built a frame to pull the engine from car and it worked well to hoist the boat off of the trailer.

Bill (wturn-at-mindspring.com)
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Mon Mar 30, 1998 1:00 am

<P><EM>The inspection ports should be on the bottom of your cockpit. Two of them on either side of the centerboard trunk.</EM></P><P>Are these the circular "covers" in the floor of the cockpit, just aft of the cuddy cabin? If they are, I now know what you're talking about. I never looked in there for access to the centerboard. I was looking on the centerboard trunk itself. I'll have to check.</P><P>Thanks.</P>

Mike Boone (boonedocks-at-kagi.com)
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Mon Mar 30, 1998 1:00 am

The circular ports are them. I don't know if you can actually see the bolt that holds the centerboard but it is an easy reach. Just don't let go of your wrenches, unless you would like them banging around inside the
hull forever! :-).

Bill (wturn-at-mindspring.com)
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Sun May 31, 1998 12:00 am

Your information on replacing the centerboard was interesting and helpful.
Do you have any thoughts on replacing a broken centerboard lift wire?

Frank Reid (ReidPVF-at-AOL.com)
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Sun Jan 03, 1999 1:00 am

I have a 1984 DS II. It appears that the centerboard lift wire no longer pulls that centerboard all the way up. What is the likely problem? I thought perhaps the wire has worked its way into the centerboard itself. Any suggestions for working getting the boat off the trailer so I can access the centerboard. I don't have easy access to a beach or a hoist. If I were to hoist it, is there a recommended method for attaching the hoist. Thanks for your help.

Francis DeCarvalho (gozzie-at-msn.com)
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Wed Jan 06, 1999 1:00 am

Francis,
I just had my board out to fix the 'sticking' problem. I had the benefit of two lifting eyes, one on each side about 8-10 from the transom. I'm not sure of any other way I'd trust a hookup enough to get under the boat. I used my sons wooden swing set as a make-do hoist. Some of the others suggested sliding the boat off the trailer and rolling it up on its side. I tried to do this with bad results. First its more heavy than it appears. It also wants to slide away at about a fourth of the way over... watch your feet! Might work with a bunch of helpers but not with 2-3.
As to your problem, does the lower line have any tension on it? It should be lose and free to prevent it from binding the lift process. Can you push and block the board up and check for more slack in the lift line? You might have a stretched cable but I find it hard to believe that it could stretch that much. If you can get the board down enough (with rear of boat hoisted) you might check to be sure there isn't a stick or something up in there, (if you can not push the board up with both lines loose).

Would like to hear what you find...

Jim Brown (beaner-at-fusenet.com)
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Tue Jan 12, 1999 1:00 am

Jim:
Thanks for the tips on working on my centerboard.
Did you say you had two lifting eyes 8 to 10 (feet?) from the transom? This would place them roughly amid ship, bow to stern.á Is there a third point for stability?

Francis DeCarvalho (gozzie-at-msn.com)
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Thu Jan 14, 1999 1:00 am

Francis,

Sorry.. left the inches off the distance. These are U-bolt type that pass thru the lip or overhang. They are for marine use(they have teak saddles) but I don't know where the previous owner got them. The mounting holes were drilled inline with the channel under the overhang.

By the way, have fun getting the pivot bolt back in thru the board if you take it out for service... two people lots of patience or luck!

Jim Brown (beaner-at-fusenet.com)
Guest
 


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