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Re: Rope for various lines

PostPosted: Sun Nov 17, 2019 5:51 pm
by K.C. Walker
Green Lake, I think the small-diameter hook is the answer. Mine is a quarter-inch and blunt enough that it doesn't want to get into the Amsteel loop easily while it's under tension.

Talbot, the problem is the tail/Amsteel joint is past the turning block and it's a tight fit through the block.

Re: Rope for various lines

PostPosted: Sun Nov 17, 2019 7:53 pm
by GreenLake
Let me know how it works out.

Re: Rope for various lines

PostPosted: Tue Nov 19, 2019 12:06 pm
by RobH912
GreenLake wrote:Right around that time I also upgraded the main sheet to FSE Robline racing sheet in 3/8".
Image
That rope has an interesting "rag wool sock" feel to it, best I can describe it. It is nice and grippy, runs well and works fine in the single ratchet block I use on the boom (above the still original CB trunk fitting). I had much earlier changed the transom setup to a traveler like the one described in Phill Root's Rigging guide.


GL - see this post going back to 2015. Do you still like the FSE Robline racing sheet? A little hard to find these days. I went to FSE Robline site (Austria) and the dealer locator function pointed me to West Marine for US. West Marine's site says "This item is no longer available." Do you know of site that offers the racing sheet product?

While on the WM site I also looked at some of the New England Rope Products. Anyone use the Regatta Braid for a main sheet? Felt pretty good to me when I went to a store. https://www.westmarine.com/buy/new-engl ... ecordNum=2

Anyone have other suggestions for main sheet line?

Re: Rope for various lines

PostPosted: Tue Nov 19, 2019 2:59 pm
by GreenLake
Supposedly, you can special order it from https://www.fisheriessupply.com/fse-robline-racing-sheet-pro. Maybe I should order a replacement while it's still available. Really like this for the mainsheet.

If you go back in the thread, K.C. Walker suggested an alternative (Bzzz).

Don't know about Regatta Braid, although my local store carries it. Will have to check it out next time I go there.

Re: Rope for various lines

PostPosted: Wed Nov 20, 2019 2:02 am
by talbot
Fisheries supply is a good source. Selection not as great as some places, but have really good prices on some products.

In traditional kernmantel construction, I like Robline Dinghy Lite (all polypro, weighs zilch) and Samson Trophy Braid (all polyester, with a fuzzy sheath that makes it really easy to hold. I used the former for light air, the latter for heavy weather.

Note that Teufelberger, the makers of Robline, also own New England ropes. If Robline dropped its soft braid, it might have been to avoid brand confusion with NE's competing products.

Re: Rope for various lines

PostPosted: Wed Nov 20, 2019 11:29 am
by RobH912
Talbot - Interesting that Teufelberger owns both FSE Robline & New England Ropes. I'd missed that, and I'm sure that product managers work to keep products distinct. You've got the Dinghy Light in 5/16?

GL - thanks for pointing out K.C. Walker's post on Bzzz. I do see that Fisheries Supply has the Robline Racing sheet pro 3/8 as a special order item in Red only.

A couple of weeks back I went to my local West Marine but found that their at store selection of lines was not very good. They did not have Bzzz, and they only had Dinghy Light in the 1/4" which felt too thin in my hand and didn't seem appropriate for a DS mainsheet. I liked the feel of 3/8 Regatta in my hand... maybe more the size of the line than the line itself...

Realizing that selecting lines is like "Goldilocks" and unfortunately it seems hard to get to a store that has my options "in hand."

Fisheries' pricing looks very good. 5/16 Dinghy Light is $.53/ft vs. West Marines' at $.99

Since it is winter have some time to figure the main sheet out.

Re: Rope for various lines

PostPosted: Wed Nov 20, 2019 7:09 pm
by K.C. Walker
I'm still using the Bzzz line and put it on a couple of other boats, as well. It is soft in hand and grippy. It definitely looks like old socks now, but it still holds well in the ratchet block. I use the lighter smaller diameter for my jib and Utility Power Sail. The UPS has quite a lot of sheet load and the Bzzz holds really well in the auto ratchet blocks. A couple of nice things about it is that it holds no water, so it remains really lightweight. Being a single braid, it doesn't tangle at all or get twisted. Also, because of being a single braid of soft fiber it has very low internal friction going to the blocks. This means less effort to pull in the sheet under load. It's also very reasonably priced. I get mine from Intensity Sails. I sail in the same series as Jim Myers, who owns that company, and he's a really good guy. Geez, I should sell this stuff! :-)

Honestly, I switched from double braid original and was so happy with this that I really never tried anything else.

Re: Rope for various lines

PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2019 1:33 pm
by RobH912
K.C. Walker wrote:I'm still using the Bzzz line and put it on a couple of other boats, as well. It is soft in hand and grippy. It definitely looks like old socks now, but it still holds well in the ratchet block.... Geez, I should sell this stuff! :-)

Honestly, I switched from double braid original and was so happy with this that I really never tried anything else.


K.C. - You are so enthusiastic on Bzzz, it is a lot less expensive than FSE Robline Racing Sheet Pro, and Bzzz is easier to get that, I ordered some last night for my main sheet.

Maybe you should sell this stuff :D

Re: Rope for various lines

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2020 4:13 pm
by GreenLake
When I upgraded my halyards to use Amsteel with a double braided tail in 2012, I discussed that project in a different thread, but apparently never collected those details here.

GreenLake wrote:I'm in the process of replacing the halyard with Amsteel as well. In this context, check out the website http://l-36.com.

He describes how to splice a halyard http://l-36.com/halyard_splice.php

I found the descriptions easy to follow, but, here's the caveat, the dimensions he gives didn't work for me. I hadn't used Sta-Set, but "equivalent" rope from another manufacturer, and it was just a bit too wide, so that it simply wouldn't fit the opening in the Amsteel.

Solution: I used a short length of larger diameter Amsteel to make the splice, and then spliced the Amsteel using a Brummel splice. To be deployed whenever I get to take out the DS this season.


In that thread, another user mentioned that he had an existing tail with a loop and simply used a loop splice to connect. The advantage to him, was the ability to connect a halyard tensioner at that point.

Then, somebody asked "Why not use Amsteel for the full length of the halyard?" and this was my reply:

GreenLake wrote:The main reason for adopting a split Amsteel / double braid solution for the halyard is that the Amsteel is can be sized very thin and is very slippery. This makes handling the halyard unpleasant. It is better to make the part that is being handled from a more grippy material - which also doesn't have as low-stretch.

There are ropes that are Dyneema core with a very grippy cover. These can be used for halyards at rather low diameters, but they are grippy enough to be handled (with gloves, because you'll want to use the narrow diameter). And there's no need to change construction - in fact, it's not possible to splice rope line that.


If you want to look up the full discussion thread, you can find it here.