Intensity Sails

Moderator: GreenLake

Re: Intensity Sails

Postby Alan » Fri Aug 09, 2013 2:20 pm

Intensity sails set.jpg
Intensity sails set.jpg (133.96 KiB) Viewed 5965 times
Intensity main - head.jpg
Intensity main - head.jpg (77.98 KiB) Viewed 5965 times
Intensity sails set.jpg
Intensity sails set.jpg (133.96 KiB) Viewed 5965 times


I did a test fit of the sails this morning. Yep, they're for the right boat.

The second photo shows the main not quite all the way to the top of the mast, despite vigorous tugging on the halyard. I'm wondering if the splice is to big to fit in the sheave - something to be checked once I lower the mast.

The third photo shows the jib tack. I can get the luff tight, but not the luff wire. I hate to unwind and extend that fancy-looking link, and maybe it's something you're not supposed to do. I seem to recall that there's a recent thread on a similar topic - maybe the answer is there.
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Intensity jib tack.jpg
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Alan
 
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Re: Intensity Sails

Postby Alan » Fri Aug 09, 2013 3:13 pm

GreenLake,

You posted this on the "Jib tack question" thread (boldface my additions):

"Re: Jib Tack question

Postby GreenLake » Tue Jul 16, 2013 9:55 pm
I'm not able to take a look right now, but my Jotz sail came with that configuration (minus the bronze shackle).
The halyard tensions the luff wire. The luff tension (in the cloth) is adjustable by pull on the grommet. The lashings would provide a maximum distance between tack and deck, hence defining a minimum tension in the luff. The shackle looks like it can / could be connected to some kind of downhaul for additional control.

I haven't ever seen the need to try and play with these options, and, if I recall my discussion with Hank Jotz at the time correctly, he essentially intimated that if the lashing he put on were to be the wrong length for my forestay, I was to adjust it once."

Sounds to me like I've got the arrangement you describe there, and that I should loosen the lashing, get the luff wire tight, then tighten the lashing to tighten the cloth at the luff. Does that make sense to you?
Alan
 
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Re: Intensity Sails

Postby GreenLake » Sat Aug 10, 2013 3:03 am

Guess so. As I wrote, I never needed to adjust those.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Intensity Sails

Postby Alan » Mon Aug 12, 2013 3:45 pm

It suddenly occurred to me to contact Intensity Sails and ask them about adjusting the lashing. It can be adjusted. I think I'd better do that, otherwise the fabric will be taking all of the strain with no help from the wire.
Alan
 
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Re: Intensity Sails

Postby talbot » Tue Aug 27, 2013 6:27 pm

Regarding the main, it does appear that the halyard won't fit through the sheave at the top of the mast. You might try cutting the halyard at the eyesplice and simply tying the shackle on with a bowline. You could also keep the splice, and use the downhaul to tension the luff. The only problem with that is the boom might end up too low. One of the design features George O'Day insisted on in the DS was a boom that would clear the heads of the crew. Another consideration is racing, where the height of the boom is specified by rule.
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Re: Intensity Sails

Postby GreenLake » Tue Aug 27, 2013 9:45 pm

An eyesplice can indeed be too bulky. Exacerbated by the fact that many DS sailors overdimension their running rigging. :)

A splice, with shackle, is not the shortest possible connection, especially if much of the splice can't fit the sheaves.

A bowline isn't necessarily the best alternative. Because it can't be cinched after it's tied, its fixed loop is often longer than necessary.

A buntline hitch (google for tying instructions) has the advantage that it cinches up and therefore represents the smallest possible loop. It was invented for being tied to a flogging part of the sail and won't come loose. In modern rope, it is easy enough to undo it after it's been loaded. I used that for a number of years for my jib.

Another method is a toggle at the end of the halyard. A bight is pushed through the cringle and the toggle (or large knot, e.g. diamond knot) is brought from one side of the headboard to the other and trapped by the bight. This connection adds at most a single rope diameter in length and is trivial to tie and undo.

I'm currently using a soft shackle based on the excellent instructions on http://l-36.com. I tied a short end around the cringle using a cow hitch and finishing in a large knot (diamond knot). The soft shackle is a special eye splice with an eye that can be worked open and will pull tight under load (easy with Dyneema). The halyard gets connected to the toggle by opening the eye and placing it around the knot. That gives a reasonably short connection which is quick to connect - a little bit slower than a metal shackle, but not by much.

As a Dyneema halyard can use a smaller diameter, the eyesplice will fit the sheaves.

I enjoyed the splicing work in that setup, but I'm thinking that the toggle at the end of the halyard is the best approach. Instead of a fancy knot, just use one of those terminating balls.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Intensity Sails

Postby jdoorly » Tue Aug 27, 2013 10:59 pm

I've had an Intensity jib and main for a few years now. I could not have afforded new sails if it were not for their low prices. They surely do a good job of converting wind into movement. I figured that the low price was a trade-off in the long run, but since I like to work on boat things I would make it all right in the long run.

The first thing to occur after I got the sails, was what we called "Irish Penants" in boot camp. That is the tendency for un-hemmed material to shed threads, and for the threads to hang in the wind and flutter like penants. This is not a problem for concern if you stabilize the sail's fabric edges before the edges become frayed under the zig-zag stitches and the sail looses strength. There are substances you wouldn't want to use as an adhesive in this case; super glue can cure very roughly, to the point of drawing blood if you tough it. Rubber cement contains Toulene and it's my guess you don't want to put any of the "*ene" chemicals or other solvents on you nice new sails. I used "Liquid Stitch" a glue to use on fabric instead of sewing thread, but it's beginning to age and deteriorate probably due to UV.

Another problem I have is the length of the foot of the main. Initially I didn't notice that the sail was too short there. But, I eventually got around to measuring the mast, boom, etc., and put electrical tape where the bands should be. Turns out that I can't make the clew get anywhere near the 10ft mark on the boom, and if I might remind y'all, I installed slugs on the mainsail which moved the sail aft an inch or more. The best I can get with my 3::1 outhaul purchase is about 9' 10".

If I knew then, what I know now I would rather not have the little window in the main. At this point it holds its shape very well but the shape it holds is not very aerodynamic. And, I have twice punctured the window material because I anchored too close to trees, and I believe that sailcloth would not have succumbed under the pressure applied. Of course, the little windows in the sails never adequately inform in the way you hoped they would.

Many of us have more expensive sails from other lofts (dare I say Intensity has a loft in CONUS?) My boat came with old Niel Pryde sails, and there are quite a few small improvements in the more expensive sails. So I would have to sum up that if you can afford better sails get them, they will last a long time. If you can't then go ahead and get Intensity sails but understand the trade-off is quality for price.
DS2 #6408 "Desperado"
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Re: Intensity Sails

Postby talbot » Wed Aug 28, 2013 3:04 pm

I'm pretty sure my Intensity main foot is 10'. I think what jdoorly encountered is a case of (lack of) quality control.
I also would not have been able to get new sails were it not for Intensity prices.
I also have problems with loose threads, but I haven't done anything but snip them off. I think the fabric itself is of comparable weight to the old Pryde sails that were original. On the other hand, when I sailed with John Alesch (jeadstx) in Texas this summer, I was impressed with the weight of his sails. They were made of much stouter fabric than Intensity. My dream sails would be:
1. Heavier than Intensities.
2. Provided with two reef points.
3. Provided with cunningham cringle and leech lines
4. Have full battens
5. Use sail slugs
6. Come with Insignia and sail number
7. Cost nothing, last forever, and be delivered to me by a magic fairy.
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Re: Intensity Sails

Postby GreenLake » Wed Aug 28, 2013 11:19 pm

you forgot:

8. have solar panels woven into them for quick recharge of your battery
9. self trimming and
10. self stowing

:D :D
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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