New Owner Oday Daysailer III

Regarding the DS3 only. Note that the DS3 is not a class-legal Day Sailer.

Moderator: GreenLake

New Owner Oday Daysailer III

Postby daysailer3 » Wed Sep 26, 2018 9:45 pm

Totally new to sailing. bought a Daysailer 3 set ot up with the owner but after purchase too much time elapsed before I could do it again and forgot it all.Does anyone have pictures of how the lines are set. The one from boom to the cam cleat thats mounted on the side of the centerboard trunk. I'm not sure how the jib is supposed to be set. a mess I know, just want to have it somewhat safely set up to try it out. Any info or pictures would be really appreciated.
Thank you
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Re: New Owner Oday Daysailer III

Postby GreenLake » Wed Sep 26, 2018 10:40 pm

The basic setup for any type of DaySailer isn't very complicated - however, there are many slight variations on how individual boats are set up.

The mainsail usually has more variability and you may need to give us a bit more of a description of how your boat is equipped or post some photos here (see the "How to use the forum..." section for instructions on posting images).

Let me give you a generic description, suitable for jibs that are not roller furled, but hanked on. As you write that you are new to sailing, I'll try to explain (gloss) any nautical terms as we go along.

For the jib, you normally have three lines: the halyard, that raises the sail and the two sheets that are used to trim the sail.

After the sail is hanked to the forestay (the wire from mast to front of boat) and the tack (bottom front corner of sail) secured to the stemhead fitting at the bow (same the forestay attaches to), the halyard is clipped or tied to the head of the sail. It runs upward, parallel to the forestay to a block (pulley) that sits on the mast right below the forestay. From there it runs down along the mast to a cleat. (Some boats have a block at the bottom of the mast and a cleat on deck).

When setting up, the halyard needs to be run through the block first, as you won't be able to reach it with the mast up. (And most people don't take it off the mast for the season).

After you've attached the halyard you can raise the sail and should give it good tension, so the luff (front edge of the sail) does not sag when the wind fills the sail.

To control the sail, you have two sheets; they are attached to the clew, or rear corner of the sail, and lead each to their respective side of the boat - inside the shrouds (side stays, or wires to the side of the mast). There's usually some kind of fairlead on each side deck (a block on a bit of track) and there should be some cleat. Cleats can be either also on the track, or in the middle of the boat on top of the centerboard.

As you sail, you use the leeward sheet (the one opposite the side the wind comes from) to control the angle of the jib, while leaving the windward one slack. If you tack through the wind, you let go of one sheet and pull tight the other. Usually, you would have some kind of stopper knot (google "figure eight knot" for tying instructions) to prevent the slack sheet from being completely pulled out.

Let me know if this level of description is helpful, or too basic?

For the main, I am confused that you mention that the cleat is on the "side" of the centerboard. Usually, I would have expected to hear that there is a combination block and cleat at the rear corner of the CB trunk. Can you confirm the location and configuration of the cleat for the mainsheet? Also, the mainsheet configuration depends on what kind of blocks you have attacked to the boom and where (middle, or middle and end) and whether you have a traveler (usually in form of a rope bridle across the back of the boat).

You may also want to browse the gallery on this forum (small link near the top right of the page). You may find pictures of many different types of setup, but one may remind you of what you have on your boat. (Don't worry that yours is a DS3, the sail plan is the same across all types of DS, and some boat out there will be rigged like yours).

All boats should have at least two other lines rigged for the main: the main halyard and the outhaul. The latter is the line that runs along the boom to the clew of the mainsail and is used to stretch the foot of the sail (the bottom edge that runs from tack to clew of a sail). You want to have good tension on that one to keep the sail flat (except in pretty light winds, when a fuller sail will deliver a bit more power). The outhaul runs from the clew, through the fitting on the end of the boom forward to a cleat that usually sits on the side of the boom).

The boom itself my have a line near the front to pull it down against a stop at the mast. Pulling this tight after raising the sail, tightens the luff of the sail. Some sails may be equipped for other lines, like a Cunningham or a reef line; let us know whether your sail just has the standard three grommets in tack, head and clew, or additional ones.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: New Owner Oday Daysailer III

Postby daysailer3 » Tue Oct 02, 2018 11:29 pm

Thank you for the reply, things are coming together, the previous owner set up the jib with the halyard attached to the top of the jib and pulled tight with the halyard traveling down the mast and through the block to the cleat on the mast bottom. rather than pulling the jib to the block on the mast just below the forstay. I haven't had luck attaching pictures, thanks for your input, this boat has a roller furler for the jib if that makes a difference.
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Re: New Owner Oday Daysailer III

Postby GreenLake » Wed Oct 03, 2018 2:07 am

So you have the kind of furler that replaces the forestay, then? Looks like you figured that one out.

Let us know if you have any follow-up questions.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: New Owner Oday Daysailer III

Postby GreenLake » Wed Oct 03, 2018 2:09 am

For posting pictures, there's a thread in the "Forum Info and how to use this forum" section. Not as seamless as the big social media applications, but most people seem to get the hang of it eventually. Take your time.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: New Owner Oday Daysailer III

Postby daysailer3 » Sat Oct 06, 2018 9:20 pm

Thank you, I don't think the roller replaces the forestay as I have one. I'm taking it out tomorrow to figure some of this out. Only concern is that I noticed the center board is projecting about 1.5 inches below the bottom and I couldn't pull it up anymore but I think it will clear the trailer. I'm not sure how it works there is a wire that enters the centerboard trunk from the forward that connects to some pulleys ending at that cleat on the side of the centerboard trunk. I seems to be under a lot of tension. There is also an opening on the forward top of the trunk that has a piece of rope connected to more rope and pulleys that is not under tension. I guess I'll find out tomorrow but I will check this forum before I go. Thanks so much, this sailing gig is going to be fun if just because it's not so easy as turn the key.
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Re: New Owner Oday Daysailer III

Postby GreenLake » Sun Oct 07, 2018 1:42 am

So you have one of the wire-operated center boards. If you see this reply before setting out, have a look in the DS2 section of the forum - they use the same arrangement. You might learn something.

One of the things to watch out for is to not let the uphaul go slack while the board is down (some people use a bungee). You risk that it wedges itself between trunk and board, leading the board stuck in place. (At least I believe it's the uphaul that's the problem - you may want to double check that).

A bit of centerboard sag happens even with my boat (though it's a DS1 and uses a lever instead of wires).

If your board does get stuck where you can't retrieve the boat, there's nothing to it but to tip it over sideways (on the beach or in shallow water) to get at the center board. Operation is called "careening". Easily done by pulling on a halyard - the mast acting as a very long lever.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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