Single Handed Sailing

Moderator: GreenLake

Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby TIM WEBB » Fri Sep 25, 2015 10:28 pm

ChrisB wrote:Tim,

Your boom tent setup is a different animal from the tarp I used when I drysailed my boat. Your boom tent is lightweight nylon and is used occasionally. My tarp was very heavy canvas that was a permanent cover while on the trailer. It had to stand up to spring and fall heavy winds, summer rains, and occasional ice and snow in the winter months. I just didn't want that load permanently on a topping lift even though it was capable of supporting it. Factor in also that it was easier and less expensive for me to build the boom support than to install a topping lift. I built the boom support out of scrap wood I had in the garage.

Chris

Yeah, true enough I guess, with one exception: TRW's boom tent is indeed nylon, but definitely not lightweight, *especially* when wet! It's Cordura, which is actually a nylon version of canvas, so the weight thing does make me think hmmm ... ?

As just a general observation, adjustable topping lifts don't need to be all that complicated: mine is just a simple Spectra line attached to an eyestrap at the masthead, with a long fingertrap at the lower boom end attachment. Takes two seconds to lengthen or shorten. I have it set to be able to be as short as it needs to be for the boom tent or as long as it needs to be with full main up and sheeted in/vang on w/o interfering with the sail ...
Tim Webb
1979 DS2 10099 The Red Witch
(I used to be Her "staff", in the way dogs have owners and cats have staff, but alas no longer ... <pout>)
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby talbot » Tue Sep 29, 2015 12:30 am

Some good responses here.
I put lazy jacks on my boom, small lines that run up each side of the sail and are "lazy" (slacked) when not in use. Before you drop the sail, you tension the jacks, and when the sail comes down it stays on the boom, trapped between the lines. Standard procedure on cruising yachts, but admittedly unusual on a dinghy. There's a whole thread about lazy jacks on the forum, so i won't go into detail here.

I also had a sailmaker add a second reef to my main. If my crew stays home, I have to start reducing sail pretty quickly. I'm kind of a runt, and well before whitecaps appear, I have to reduce sail. I just don't have the weight to hold the boat down.

Oars or a motor are useful additions if you are alone. The DS is so wide that it is difficult to paddle alone. (But that tiller-tamer helps.)

After I once fell off the foredeck with my wife at the helm, she asked me to use an offshore harness whenever I go out alone, particularly on cold lakes or ocean estuaries where emmersion hypothermia is a real risk. I clip in directly to my hiking straps. Ideally I would also have jacklines going to the foredeck, but the way I have the boat rigged, I have so far avoided having to go forward in conditions where it would be risky. Well, except for that time I fell off . . .

Most of these modifications aren't specifically for solo sailing. Actually, I did them originally so the boat would just be more convenient to handle on our typical voyages (i.e., Sunday dinner on the lake.) But they become more than conveniences if you are alone and if the weather kicks up. And that's something to keep in mind. How much you modify your boat depends on what sailing experience you seek. If you want to keep sailing on open water in winds >20kt, yes, you need the double reef, the jib-dousing line, the hiking straps, the heaving-to, a sea anchor . . . on and on, to the limit of your worst scenario. Under other operating conditions, a lot of this stuff could be optional.
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby Tipster1 » Thu Oct 01, 2015 5:10 pm

Thank you all for constructive suggestions (and philosophical statements, too, John).

I sail in little Egg Harbor Bay, between Ship Bottom and Beach Haven, NJ. Chris. If I got in trouble at low tide, I could walk home. A blessing and a curse, but if weather got nasty, a life jacket would be sensible. I will consider a trailing line any time a tiller tamer is in use. Or a way to kill the tiller tamer if I go overboard. Or both.

I’ve sailed on lake Nockamixon and Lake Galena (Peace Valley Park) in SE PA a lot. Occasionally on lower end of Lake Wallenpaupack, but on weekends, I’d rather roller skate on an expressway.

I already rigged and used a jib down-haul. I think it’s a great idea that I’ve shared with a few other sailors. Even so, I still have my mind's eye on a pvc furler.

I also may rig a jib clew line in case it gets hung up on tacks.

Various discussions of topping lifts and boom crutches very helpful. I rigged one with a pad eye I installed on the mast and an old halyard. It's long enough, that, when the sail is raised it's quite slack. For just the boom, the load seems minimal, but if i were to leave the main on the boom, then I also would feel better with a boom crutch of some sort. Maybe some sort of Tee using PVC so it can disassemble, or, even better, Chris’s suggestion of a plank across the stern which might make motoring easier and then I could just insert a boom crutch right in the middle. And create nice spot for anchor. I definitely like idea of anchor in stern.

I have yet to reef the main, but I have original Horse-shoe thing, so I'll practice with that some day. Sails are so blown out, that before spending time and money on real reefing points, I might just spring for new ones.

I’ve transferred from kayak to Sunfish and back. How much harder could it be? :roll:

Boat is on trailer under house now awaiting another hurricane. I sat in cockpit and realized that tiller extension makes all the difference and everything is reachable when I have the whole cockpit to myself. More importantly, I showed this to first mate, who seemed quite reassured. I've already started carrying cell phone with me when windsurfing, and signal is good even in middle of bay.

Interesting perspective on jib sheets. I have a DS II with captive sheets on CB trunk. Seems to me, keeping them in place is worthwhile, but Greenlake’s critique sounds valid, too so I will definitely keep it in mind. Where are your jib cleats, G?

With an onshore wind you said you motor out to raise sail, Chris. Talk me through how you do this. Tiller “tamed” or loose? Motor running (which scares me) or off? Main first or jib? Obviously, I could drop anchor, but then you have that to deal with.

Again, thank you all.

We’re making a quick trip to Ship Bottom tomorrow to set up docking lines between house pilings and boat. We think the boat and trailer floated around together a little during Hurricane – oops - Super-storm Sandy.

Mark
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby talbot » Thu Oct 01, 2015 7:12 pm

X-shaped DS boom crutches can be purchased from D&R Marine or from Intensity Sails (and would be easy to make). The steering gear is not affected. Only problem is that the feet of the "X" can slip on the deck and the crutch can scoot out from under the boom.

What's your concern about motoring out to raise sail? You can either shut down the motor before you hoist, or keep the boat headed into the wind at slow speed. (The latter helps stabilize the boat if you are contending with waves.) Either way, sheet the main in enough to keep the boom over the boat. The DS will try to turn down, but will come back into the wind as soon as the sail starts to rise up mast.

I'm not enthusiastic about anchoring to raise sail in rough weather. I've done it, but when I'm alone, retrieving the anchor has been a hassle. I can lift the anchor to the bow chock from the cockpit, but then I have to go out on the foredeck to bring it aft. If the boat is tossing around in wind and waves (the reason we're talking about anchoring in the first place), I don't like leaving the cockpit. You can put a retrieving line on the anchor (a runner clipped to a carabiner that slides on the anchor rode after the leaves the bow chock). But even then, you begin your voyage with a heap of soggy, muddy rope around your feet.

The textbook solution is to drag a sea anchor off the bow, but a lot of us have found that the DS stubbornly lies across the wind, even with the sea anchor. And you still have the problem of how to retrieve the thing without going out on the foredeck.
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby GreenLake » Thu Oct 01, 2015 11:02 pm

Tipster1 wrote:Interesting perspective on jib sheets. I have a DS II with captive sheets on CB trunk. Seems to me, keeping them in place is worthwhile, but Greenlake’s critique sounds valid, too so I will definitely keep it in mind. Where are your jib cleats, G?


They are in the same position, except not captive (and I have the ends of my jib sheets knotted together).

When I sailed on a boat configured like yours, I found that I had a hard time trying to trim the jib in stronger winds when I was not sitting in the crew position. The direction of pull required was somewhat angled downward into the space before the windward seat. At least that's the angle that worked best, and not one I could reach unless I was sitting right at that spot. It also meant that I could only grab the part of the sheet that was already on the far side of the cleat.

On my boat, I trim the jib pulling at any point of the joined jib sheets between the fairleads. I often pick up the slack sheet on the now leeward side of the CB and pull it across the cleat before cleating it in. Definitely in all conditions where I don't have to be sitting out immediately, or I do this while ducking the boom to get on the other side.

I use ratchet blocks to allow me to hold the tension more easily. When I like the way the jib is trimmed and conditions allow it to be cleated, I move the sheet over the open cleat and, depending where I sit, either angle the line down, or push on it with my foot (for example if hiking) to make the cleat engage.

I have mentioned I have another boat, and also crew on other dinghies, and if you end up hiking out a lot, you might explore putting cleats on the opposite deck from the fairlead. Some of these other boats are a bit more lively through a tack and being able to cleat a sheet right where you are sitting works really well. As does having a cleat at the fairlead. For fixed fairleads it's easy to get a positive release across the cockpit (and also to be able to cleat them from there). For fairleads on a track, the problem would be to make sure that they don't pivot as you try to raise or lower the angle on the sheet to release or cleat it it (if the cleat is rotated 90 degrees you have the same problem but now you need to be able to get the pull forward or aft enough to release or engage the cleat).
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby talbot » Fri Oct 02, 2015 12:11 am

Greenlake, as I recall, you once mentioned that you do not use swivels on your jib cams. That would make the seating position more important, and I could see the need for non-captive cleats.

My boat came with fixed cams on the CB trunk. I found it easier to single-hand once I switched to swivels. I still have trouble sheeting in strong winds, but it has nothing to do with cleat angles. It's because I'm a wimp. Even with ratchet blocks, I'm still a wimp.

To trim in a strong wind by myself, I have to get one foot out of the hiking straps and use it to press down on the taught line between my hand and the cam. The increased pressure is equal on me and the cam, but if I can summon a moment of extra strength, the cam gives way first and lets some of the line slip through. Same trick as pulling a halyard away from the mast to get the mainsail up the last inch.

A brand-new pair of swivel cams is pretty expensive, but if the boat we're discussing has working fixed cams now, it might be possible to buy the swivels separately. Also, Ronstan (and I imagine Harken, Schaeffer, etc.) sell wide angle fairleads for their cams that purport to obviate the need for swivels.
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby GreenLake » Fri Oct 02, 2015 1:23 am

The jib tracks that I use have just the ratchet blocks on them.
1818
The cam cleats on the CB are fixed.
1034
The cleats are angled a bit for better alignment.

They are really easy to release, but in general, I rather have a setup that releases on a hair trigger than one that can take too long to release.

I seem to have no problem getting a loaded jib sheet to cleat, even though I may need a bit of foot support, when I'm pulling across the cockpit -- because the CB trunk is lower than the coaming. I usually sit far enough forward that swivel cams seem not an answer to the problem. My problem with captive cams is that when I reach for the sheet without thinking, it's quite normally for the part that's on the "wrong" side of the cleat, and with a captive cleat that is worse than useless. They might address the issue I had on that DSII I sailed on, where I couldn't help the crew from the skipper position; there it was just a matter of a bit of trim, not hauling the sheet tight after a tack.

The ratchet blocks make it feasible for me to hold the sheets. I can hold them in strong-ish winds if I'm sailing in the crew position, and I can hold both main and jib sheet in the same hand in moderate winds if single handing (which is our topic here). In moderate but gusty winds, or when I'm sailing off the wind in traffic, or in light, fluky winds holding both sheets in one hand is strangely effective. Sitting a bit aft of the thwarts, I just move my hand until I get to a position where the relative tension of both sheet is the way I want it. It looks like I'm gesticulating in a strange sign language, but it allows me to adjust both simultaneously and there are cases where that seems called for.

I'm a wimp when it comes to some types of strength, but pulling on a line is one of the things that seem to come easier. But I can feel the effect of the ratchet on my hands. And I also found that switching to a grippier line can make a difference. (The jib sheets in the photos are not particularly grippy and when it comes to replace them, I'll go for something else. They are smooth and don't get caught on things easily, though).
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby Interim » Fri Oct 02, 2015 9:06 am

Tipster1 wrote:With an onshore wind you said you motor out to raise sail, Chris. Talk me through how you do this. Tiller “tamed” or loose? Motor running (which scares me) or off? Main first or jib? Obviously, I could drop anchor, but then you have that to deal with.

Mark


Mark--

I have another boat--26'--where I am dealing with this issue of motoring into the wind while I try to hoist the main. If there is wind above 7 or 8 knts, the bow quickly gets pushed off the wind and I'm sailing with the main half-way up the mast. I've been told more power will give it more stability, but this seems like a high-risk: high-reward method. Mostly risk. This winter I will rig my halyards so they lead to the cockpit, at least keeping me near the tiller. For now, I won't single-hand it if there is that much breeze.

On the DS, I am lucky in that I am (almost) always able to sail from and to the pier, so I can raise at least the main while tied up. I put the jib on the foredeck with a robber's knot (or Highwayman's knot, if you prefer), so I can quickly and easily hoist it while underway.

Tomorrow's forecast, naturally, is for 9 knots from the one direction that requires me to paddle out and drop and anchor to raise the main. Fortunately, forecasts are rarely 100% accurate.

--john
1979 DSII
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby K.C. Walker » Fri Oct 02, 2015 12:18 pm

I single hand a majority of the time so I have worked to set up my boat to make that easier.

+1 for a tiller extension; mine is an adjustable length Ronstan. When extended I can squeeze myself up against the cuddy and still be able to hike out and steer.

+1 for a tiller tamer. I made mine with a variable clutch and it works great.

+1 for hiking straps. I'm in a DS 1 and have them configured at the height of the thwart. They attach at each end of the centerboard trunk and attached about midway out on the thwart (attached to the bottom side). They are somewhat loose but held against the centerboard trunk with budgies. I find them comfortable enough even in bare feet and they're just webbing, though do use booties. If I need to hike out further I can pull my feet out almost to the seat top and still be in the straps.

+1 for ratchet blocks all around. I have a Harken 75 mm on the main and like it. I have Allen brothers 60 mm on the jib and would prefer to have them be auto ratchets, but they hold really well. I've got Allen 62 mm auto ratchets on the big UPS jennaker and those work great.

+1 for easy to grip sheet line. I'm using New England Ropes Buzz line and it feels great and grips well.

Sailing gloves are another seriously good aid, the grippier the better. I wear them out pretty fast, though. I love the grip in those rubberized cloth work gloves but wear those out in one good windy day. My West Marine sailing gloves are toast after a little more than one season.

99.9% of the time I leave the dock under power and 97% of the time I return to the dock using the motor.

I use sail slugs on the main and have a mast gate to keep them captive. Raising the main is quick (McLube helps) and I do that first while under power. The motor is revved enough to maintain steerage. I do need to sometimes tweak the rudder with my toe (tiller tamer engaged). I leave the mainsheet loose so do need to keep pointing pretty much upwind (but I don't want to start sailing unintentionally). The jib goes up quickly after that. I quickly move back, hit the kill switch and tilt the motor up. And off we go! At times it does get pretty exciting. Oh yes, and using a topping lift definitely helps with this setup. I sail where there are a bunch of islands so if it's too windy to raise sail in open water, I go hide behind one of the islands, I suppose that's cheating a bit.
KC Walker, DS 1 #7002
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby GreenLake » Fri Oct 02, 2015 1:42 pm

K.C.Walker wrote:I sail where there are a bunch of islands so if it's too windy to raise sail in open water, I go hide behind one of the islands, I suppose that's cheating a bit.

Nah, just good seamanship! Use any advantage you can get!

I'm lucky that my two favorite launch areas are in the lee of a headland and / or buildings. Makes it easy to sail off the beach or dock, so my figures of motor use are practically the reverse of yours, but I'm practicing docking under sail wherever and whenever I get a chance, and that includes a variety of different conditions and locations.

One of the local informal boat races has a "meet at the middle of the lake with sails down and motor off" rule, where at the start signal you raise your sails and then go round any of a number of government marks in a sequence of your choosing. I know I sailed that solo on occasion, but generally I mostly don't raise / lower sails so much when on open water.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby Tipster1 » Fri Oct 02, 2015 6:11 pm

Good points about ratchet blocks and cam cleats, GL. These will go on wish list. On a DS II, I can’t imagine a good location for cleats on opposite deck that wouldn’t create seating or tripping problem.

Thanks for feedback about sail raising and other suggestions, Cpn. Talbot. The whole idea of being any distance from a running motor makes me nervous. I guess it’s pretty safe if swivel is tightened down pretty hard. Or I could use the OB tiller extension I just found in the garage.

Since I already installed pad eye for topping lift on one side of mast, one more pad eye and then lazy jacks would be easy.

My boat came with x-shaped boom crutch. It doesn’t inspire confidence and doesn’t coexist well with outboard.

Concept of anchor line retrieving runner intriguing and cool. I had been wondering how I could have anchor ready to deploy from stern but attached to bow while sitting in between in the cockpit.

I don’t plan to sail in over 15 kts intentionally, at least not as long as I can still wind-surf. I'm now in what is called "Vintage" class.

Questions for all:

1. If the motor is off and you’re not on a mooring, do you need to use tiller tamer when you raise sail on the water?
2. If so, do you start with rudder fixed amidships?
3. What about CB? My location has draft issues so fully lowered CB can get you stuck.
4. Do you raise main or jib first?

Bonus Question for Cpn Talbot: Where do you sail near Eugene? We visited there once, but I don’t recall any big water.

Mark V
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby GreenLake » Fri Oct 02, 2015 8:36 pm

Tipster1 wrote:I don’t plan to sail in over 15 kts intentionally, at least not as long as I can still wind-surf. I'm now in what is called "Vintage" class.

Questions for all:

1. If the motor is off and you’re not on a mooring, do you need to use tiller tamer when you raise sail on the water?
2. If so, do you start with rudder fixed amidships?
3. What about CB? My location has draft issues so fully lowered CB can get you stuck.
4. Do you raise main or jib first?


Hmm, vintage class. :)

I find that I need a tiller tamer anytime the boat is moving, except(!) on some rare condition when the sail trim results in perfect balance. Then it can take a while before the boat leave the groove.

Without a motor running, the amount of time the DS will spend drifting upwind on momentum is limited. If you were going really fast, and the winds are light, you might have long enough to do something, but I don't know. As soon as you sail backwards, any deflection of the rudder will magnify (and the force on the tiller tamer can be much greater than going forward).

Less directional control w/ raised CB, but experiment will tell you.

If I was motoring, I would raise main first. However, I've done this sequence (regularly) in moderate winds that were blowing offshore. Push off the beach. Drift a bit downwind, lower rudder and CB, raise jib, and immediately go on a reach. After some speed has built up, shoot into the wind to raise main. If I can only partially raise the main before the boat falls off, let out mainsheet and use both main and jib to get some speed to do another attempt.

Usually, I get the main up, but not tight, and have to shoot into the wind one or two more times to get the halyard tight, the boom lowered and tight, outhaul tightened for trim, Cunningham set, if needed, etc..

Now, I realize that this is in the context of single-handed sailing. Fair disclaimer: the maneuver described is one that I've done that way but always with a novice at the tiller, and not a tiller tamer.
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby TIM WEBB » Fri Oct 02, 2015 8:55 pm

If you have the room, just raise the sails into a hove to position: CB preferably down, but partway up OK, tiller held hard over to leeward by tamer or crew. Raise jib and sheet to windward, "backing" it. Boat is now hove to, basically in "neutral", and it will just drift along more or less just off the wind. Now you can easily raise the main, leaving the sheet loose. When you're ready, center the tiller and let the jib go to leeward, sheet in main and jib, and off you go! ;-P
Tim Webb
1979 DS2 10099 The Red Witch
(I used to be Her "staff", in the way dogs have owners and cats have staff, but alas no longer ... <pout>)
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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby Tipster1 » Sat Oct 03, 2015 7:49 am

This is turning into a really great conversation. My first choice would always be to raise sails at anchor or mooring or tied to lee of dock. But, just for the challenge and skill buiklding, I can’t wait to try fastening Tim’s method of tiller leeward, raise and cross sheet jib and kind of putter along until main is up. Once up, if you want to stay hove to, what do you do with main?

So far, my plan for lunch, at least at low tide is lower CB fully over sand bar, like a parking brake. ;)

To KC. thanks for all these suggestions. If you haven’t already, look around at Home Depot or even better Harbor Freight for cheap gloves. How did you make your tiller tamer?

GL’s very cool sprint method sounds more like windsurfing maneuver, except on a windsurfer, mistakes mean swimming.

FY A&A: Formula Windsurfing Classes:

3 DIVISIONS
3.1 Gender Divisions: Men and Women.
3.2 Age Divisions:
3.2.1 A Junior shall be under the age of 17 (born in or after 1998, not later than 2001).
3.2.1 A Youth shall be under the age of 20 (born in or after 1995, not later than 2000).
3.2.2 A Senior shall be born in or between 1994 and 1979 for men, or 1982 for women.
3.2.3 A Master shall be a man over the age of 35 (born 1978 or earlier) or a woman over the age of 30 (born 1983 or earlier).
3.2.4 A Grand Master shall be a man over the age of 45 (born 1968 or earlier) or a woman over the age of 40 (born 1973 or earlier).
3.2.5 A Veteran shall be a man over the age of 55 (born 1958 or earlier)
3.3 A minimum of 5 competitors is required to constitute a division.

We’re petitioning for a “Medicare” class which could be the largest group, at least in the US. Windsurfing, sadly, may be the US’s fastest shrinking sport except for maybe roller blading. :( There's nothing quite like getting up to a GPS confirmed 25 knots and passing Hobie cats :!:

Here's a thank you present to all:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWINygI ... 0E407432C9

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Re: Single Handed Sailing

Postby TIM WEBB » Sat Oct 03, 2015 12:09 pm

Tipster1 wrote:This is turning into a really great conversation. My first choice would always be to raise sails at anchor or mooring or tied to lee of dock. But, just for the challenge and skill buiklding, I can’t wait to try fastening Tim’s method of tiller leeward, raise and cross sheet jib and kind of putter along until main is up. Once up, if you want to stay hove to, what do you do with main?

So far, my plan for lunch, at least at low tide is lower CB fully over sand bar, like a parking brake. ;)

You just leave the mainsheet loose and let the boom find where it wants to be to leeward - the main isn't part of the hove to "equation". If you're in waves or chop, the boat will be rolling a bit, so having the boom vang on will keep the boom from bouncing wildly up and down.

Love the parking break idea, but would be somewhat concerned with "hyperextending" the CB against the forward end of the trunk if the boat pivots around? Saw a guy do something similar on a trip to Silver Glen, but it was a Potter 19 with a metal daggerboard, in a protected springs with no waves, and only the gentle current of the spring water flowing past ...

Nice video!
Tim Webb
1979 DS2 10099 The Red Witch
(I used to be Her "staff", in the way dogs have owners and cats have staff, but alas no longer ... <pout>)
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