New sailer /boat ID

Moderator: GreenLake

New sailer /boat ID

Postby Pozos » Thu Jun 19, 2014 10:27 am

Hello,
I am new to sailing and considering stepping up from a sunfish. There is a daysailer for sale reportedly in good shape and reasonably priced but the owner does not know the year of manufacture. He does not have ability to send a photo but I can go take a look (at some distance). He sent me these #s:
Serial# 20209
Class# 3693

I want a boat with positive floatation for safety--- older children and friends may sail.

I plan to moor on a lake in Maine.

I would love some help identifying if this is a daysailer 1 or daysailer 11 as I understand the daysailer 1 did not have floatation built in. He also told me that the boat is not self bailing.
Thank you.
Jake
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Re: New sailer /boat ID

Postby rnlivingston » Thu Jun 19, 2014 11:45 am

Hi Jake

Judging by the numbers, I would say this is a 1969 Daysailer 1. The Daysailer 1 does have flotation in the form of seat tanks and a bow tank. More than likely, the foam in the tanks are waterlogged and need to be replaced. While a bailer can be installed, they were not standard equipment on this boat. For your situation, I would recommend looking for a Daysailer II.
Roger Livingston
DS 6872
Mariner 4096
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Re: New sailer /boat ID

Postby rnlivingston » Thu Jun 19, 2014 11:49 am

Here is a nice DS II in York , ME

http://maine.craigslist.org/boa/4465087173.html
Roger Livingston
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Re: New sailer /boat ID

Postby GreenLake » Thu Jun 19, 2014 11:56 am

The DS2 has a double hull, but it's not necessarily more than an air space. Meaning that it could fill during a capsize, if there are any leaks. The DS1 has three separate tanks, one under each seat and a third in front. They should be foam filled, but, over time, the foam may have been exposed to water. So, for both DS1 and DS II you would want to make sure that
1) any foam that's in the boat isn't waterlogged
2) replace foam/air with better material

This usually involves cutting holes for deck plates (inspection ports) and using them to remove/re-insert flotation. Materials for step 2 range from better foam to pool noodles to empty soda bottles (caps sealed with sealants).

Adding inspection ports is a moderate effort and not very expensive.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: New sailer /boat ID

Postby kokko » Thu Jun 19, 2014 12:52 pm

You would ikely have the same issue with either a DS1 or DS2. Both used foam blocks in the flotation tanks. I do not know if they put foam blocks in the space between the cockpit decks and hull in a ds2. In any event there are loads of us that have cut in inspection ports and yanked out the old waterlogged foam. Buy the boat and join the DS gang!
DS1 Truelove
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Re: New sailer /boat ID

Postby Pozos » Fri Jun 20, 2014 7:35 am

Many thanks for the information. Now another ?. I have spent some time reading on this site and it seems lots of folks make inspection ports and pull waterlogged foam out. Are the ports simply holes open to the outside or are they sealed with caulk and plexiglass. And how do you get large pieces of foam out small holes. And I guess i understand that if you use pool noodles or soda jugs for new floatation you just stuff in as many as you can? Am I on track?
Jake
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Re: New sailer /boat ID

Postby rnlivingston » Fri Jun 20, 2014 7:55 am

Most us use screw-in inspection ports...in my case I installed 4 inch ports on the sides of the seat tanks and a 6 inch port on the bow tank. I cut the holes for the ports using the outside ring as a template, but did not install the ports. The holes were large enough to pull most of the old form through. The pieces too big I was able to break in half inside the tanks. The boat had sat in someone's yard for 20 plus years, so we had to pull out many rodent's nests also. Not fun. The old foam has been replaced with pool noodles from the Dollar Store.
Roger Livingston
DS 6872
Mariner 4096
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Re: New sailer /boat ID

Postby Alan » Fri Jun 20, 2014 11:04 am

This is the type of port people use:

http://www.drmarine.com/proddetail.asp?prod=DR145
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Re: New sailer /boat ID

Postby GreenLake » Fri Jun 20, 2014 12:35 pm

D&R Marine is generally a good place to get DS related hardware, but there are better sources for deck plates.

For example:
http://www.fisheriessupply.com/marine-hardware/deck-plates-and-access-hatches/deck-plates
has the choice of more styles and sizes.

Generally, you want to get the largest size that fits the surface where the hole will go, because the larger the deck plate is, the easier it is to get at any foam inside. That's why Alan mentioned not installing the deckplate until after you've removed the foam through the hole - it gives you a bit of extra opening to maneuver. I did the same thing.

For deckplates in the seats, some people leave a bit of space behind them and attach deck plate bags. This way you get a bit of waterproof storage. For that, you'd need a deck plate with a "collar" so that you can fit the opening of the bag over it and hold it in place with a bungee.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: New sailer /boat ID

Postby Alan » Fri Jun 20, 2014 12:53 pm

Something to look for when you buy a screw-in inspection port (there are also pry-out types) is the thread pattern. The ports in my cockpit floor, and the ones I replaced them with, have fine threads. Not only are they hard to line up when you install the port, they take several turns to thread all the way in, and worst of all, the threads are sharp. I still can't manage to reach into those particular inspection ports without slicing my forearms.

There are other ports (including those from West Marine) that have a quick-acting thread pattern. They're easier and faster to install, and you won't be bleeding on your boat.
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