Self bailing models

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Self bailing models

Postby powpowhunter » Sun Aug 03, 2014 3:30 pm

First of, hello all. I'm in the market for a DS, but a bit confused by all of the various vintages and models.
My biggest question so far- Are the newer DSI's ('80s Rebel, etc) self bailing/draining? Or is it only DS2s that have that distinction? Not too worried about DS3, since I've never seen one for sale.
Sorry for what I'm sure is a repeat question, but so far my searches have proven fruitless on this one specific question. Learned tons from this forum already though, so thanks so much!
-Tyler
1977 DS2 #8389 "Tidenaut"
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Re: Self bailing models

Postby Mike Gillum » Mon Aug 04, 2014 3:26 pm

The only self-rescuing DS would be an SLI (Sunfish Laser, Inc.) with the operable Foredeck Hatch on the backside of the Cuddy Cabin facing the mainsheet.
I'm not 100% that the SLI is self-rescuing as a large cockpit full of water that high up would make the boat difficult to sail so don't capsize and you'll never have to worry about whether a DS is self-rescuing!
Mike Gillum #2772 BUBBA
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Re: Self bailing models

Postby jeadstx » Mon Aug 04, 2014 3:54 pm

You already know that the DS2 has a cockpit bailer. You might check with Cape Cod Shipbuilders (current manufacturer of the Day Sailer) as to whether they have a cockpit bailer.

John
1976 Day Sailer II, #8075 - Completed the 2011, 2012, and 2013 Texas 200
1952 Beetle Boat Swan Catboat
Early Rhodes 19
1973 Mariner 2+2, #2607 - Completed 2014, 2015 and 2016 Texas 200
1969 Day Sailer I, #3229
Fleet 135; Canyon Lake, Texas
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Re: Self bailing models

Postby powpowhunter » Mon Aug 04, 2014 4:34 pm

Thanks for the info and advice. Will continue to watch for a DS2 on the market, or just get a one and try real hard to not go over.
-Tyler
1977 DS2 #8389 "Tidenaut"
powpowhunter
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2014 3:42 pm
Location: Madison, WI

Re: Self bailing models

Postby jeadstx » Mon Aug 04, 2014 5:45 pm

All the boats have flotation tanks. Even a swamped DS1 can be bailed successfully if one should should capsize.

John
1976 Day Sailer II, #8075 - Completed the 2011, 2012, and 2013 Texas 200
1952 Beetle Boat Swan Catboat
Early Rhodes 19
1973 Mariner 2+2, #2607 - Completed 2014, 2015 and 2016 Texas 200
1969 Day Sailer I, #3229
Fleet 135; Canyon Lake, Texas
jeadstx
 
Posts: 1216
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 11:10 am
Location: Dripping Springs, Tx

Re: Self bailing models

Postby SUNBIRD » Wed Apr 27, 2016 12:17 am

The Cape Cod Shipbuilding-built Day Sailers are not self-bailing, although some have been equipped with suction-type bailers to drain water when moving forward, however you need to close those quick if the boat slows down as there is nothing to prevent water from flowing back in if not closed.
The DS II and DS III are the only "self-bailing" models of the Day Sailer.
The CCSB Day Sailer is basically the same as the SLI Day Sailer. These boats (sometimes called the DS IV, officially or not) are basically a DS I with the cockpit seat molded as part of the deck and a bulkhead closing off the cuddy to serve as another flotation airtank. There is an access hatch that is gasketed and has secure latches to hold it shut. Cockpit is almost full depth of the hull and there are no wood coamings. Basically, the DS IV is what the DS II should have been, a DS I made to be more self-rescuing.

I still prefer my DS II (or the non-class-legal DS III) for my recreational sailing, better access to the cuddy on the DS II and III and the (mostly) self-bailing cockpit fit my use better. I keep my boat in the water on a mooring for the season each year. I do wish that the DS II had a lever-operated CB though, I had that on my old Widgeon and it makes CB adjustments easier and removal/re-installation much easier! In 20 years of sailing my DS II I have avoided capsizing by sailing her like the centerboard boat that she is, I always keep the mainsheet in hand (cam-cleat holds the tension) to allow instant release in a gust, spilling the wind. Addition of a boom-vang to flatten the sail, a tiller extension to allow sitting on the side decks, and a set of reefpoints in the mainsail, all have helped make sailing on windy days more pleasant. Sailing without the jib helps too (raise the CB a bit to reduce weather-helm to normal level). My motto is to avoid capsize! I have had a couple of close calls, but never felt that a capsize was unavoidable. (I don't race, so sometimes I give up a little speed for comfort)

I do admit to still "drooling" over those CCSB boats, compared to my old O'DAY they are much better built. They are also a bit pricey at $17K -22K, but worth it, and interesting that most of them lately have left the builder with roller-furling jibs and Torquedo outboards! It is also nice to know that if I need a new mast or boom, or standing rigging...... I can just sail (or motor) right up to their dock and get what I need. Kind of nice mooring my boat less than 2 miles by water or less than 4 miles by land, from CCSB. I buy most part that I need from D&R Marine, but it would be a long boat trip to Assonet, MA (but only 40 minutes by car.)
Rod Johnson, "SUNBIRD"
1979 DS II, # 10201
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