Checking out a DSII this week

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Checking out a DSII this week

Postby kewegeo » Wed Aug 28, 2019 9:11 pm

Hi Everyone, I'm fairly new here. I've owned an O'day 20 in the past and am currently looking to upgrade from a Butterfly to something larger I can sail with up to 4 kids and the wife. I'm guessing most of the time it'd be me and 2 or 3 kids.
I've looked at Mariners in the past but like that the Daysailer is easier to store in the off season, easier to launch and rig, and usually cheaper and and common.
I'm looking at a local '72 DSII later this week and wouldn't mind some opinions. It's supposedly been in indoor storage for 15 years. Hull paint is chalky, trailer kind of rusty, sails look original and soft, running rigging is probably original, rudder needs some repair. Mast and other equipment is supposedly there but not in the photos. I'm ok with old sails for a season, I'd replace the running rigging asap, and probably order new standing rigging over the winter. Overall it looks like it could sail right away.
Seller is currently asking $725 and that is recently down from $1,000. What do you all think?
Thanks!
- Ryan
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kewegeo
 
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Re: Checking out a DSII this week

Postby GreenLake » Wed Aug 28, 2019 10:24 pm

Welcome to the forum, and hope to welcome you to the DS community.

First, there is an older post here somewhere where someone did run through the same issue; what to do to evaluate a boat for sale. As I recall, there were a number of specific and useful suggestions. And, if memory serves, it related to a DSII. Might be worth scrolling backwards in time.

That said, the maim point would be that the price is right, unless there's some real structural issues with the hull. Everything else is eminently fixable on a DS and as you've sailed before you know that running rigging and sails are consumables that need to be replaced in regular intervals anyway. Just like new tires and brakes on a used car are nice, not having them should affect the price a bit, but not be a deal breaker. And boats in better conditions fetch about double.

Check for cracks and soft spots all around the hull, near the mast step, and centerboard. Also, check for deformation from the trailer bunks. The rudder looks a bit banged up in the picture, so have a look at the CB from below the trailer, even only edge on. If it's cracked visibly, I would ask to lower the price further, because you would need to replace it. However, it's possible to get replacements for both rudder and CB and you can get some that are hydrodynamically sound, unlike the factory originals. (Or build your own; not that hard. I've done my own rudder and am still fairly happy with it). Minor cracking and crazing in the gel coat, especially near stress points can be normal and is not necessarily a concern (unless it's really extensive and you were looking for a boat that can be made to look good again).

Check the mast for any defects or bends, extra holes drilled, fittings that aren't tight etc. Much of standing rigging and other mast hardware is fixable, but look whether it indicates a problem with the mast itself. Those are harder to replace, because shipping tends to be prohibitive. Likewise check the boom. You have enough experience to tell you whether something looks damaged instead of just worn and whether it's a quick fix.

Most DSIIs have some issues with their CB system. There's no way to eliminate that in a pre-purchase inspection, you simply need to be prepared to re-run up/downhaul and/or seal the uphaul opening (otherwise you have a waterspout in the cuddy). I don't own one, though I have sailed on one for an extended trip for several days and have read most of what has been posted here. It seems that most people were able to resolve or at least improve these issues with reasonable effort. Like swapping rigging, it's one of those things that comes up as boats change owners.

There are some places where there are backing plates or wood between the hulls, you may need to cut some access holes if you want to replace jib fairleads and the like, but you may well be able to sail the boat first.

I bet the boat was stored outside for a good part the 30+ years before the current owner moved it indoors. If you don't like that look, the faded hull would need being washed then buffed with a rubbing compound and polished, finally perhaps treated with an acrylic sealer. Or, alternatively painted. But that's something you can do or not do, as you see fit. Some people worry about function only for their boats, and in my experience they are not the worst sailors for that.

Last time I sourced a replacement trailer for a friend we found one for about $300; so if the trailer gets you home, you can do an overhaul and see whether the rust etc. are cosmetic, or spend the money on a replacement. If you plan to tow for any distance, pop the wheels and inspect/repack the bearings. (Also check whether any parts look at all rusted to the point of getting weak, of course, but the bearings you should be able to overhaul right there).

Does this give you the feedback you were looking for? It depends a bit on what you are looking for. If you're not afraid of doing some delayed maintenance and not willing to spend for other people's refurbishment, from what the pictures show it's not a hopeless case. As long as you check for the more serious issues.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
GreenLake
 
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Re: Checking out a DSII this week

Postby GreenLake » Wed Aug 28, 2019 10:31 pm

PS: the large cockpit on a DS makes it suitable for casual sailing with 3-4 people.

Here's an extreme example (pirates in training):
1720
(NOTE: very sheltered waters, and the entire trip stayed close to shore, at close to wading depth in fact)
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
GreenLake
 
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Re: Checking out a DSII this week

Postby kewegeo » Thu Aug 29, 2019 9:01 am

Thanks GreenLake,
That's exactly what I was looking for.
I did also find the inspection checklist elsewhere on the board here and have it ready to go.
That pirate ship is really something! I guess that's one way to deal with the low freeboard!
Thanks for all the input,
- Ryan
kewegeo
 
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Re: Checking out a DSII this week

Postby GreenLake » Thu Aug 29, 2019 12:27 pm

Pirate decoration: pink construction foam, pipe insulation, "gold" paint for muzzle accents and three cans of spray paint (white, brown and black). Turns out the paint, if overapplied, can be used to "scar" the foam board making it look like an old ship's hull. Oh, and small gun ports are made from thin corrugated cardboard, held by bits of stiff wire and epoxy coated and painted (for lack of suitable waterproof alternatives). Held by to bungees to shrouds and stern cleat. Augment by flying a pirate flag below the spreaders.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
GreenLake
 
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Re: Checking out a DSII this week

Postby Alan » Thu Aug 29, 2019 2:57 pm

If you do buy it, I recommend that the first thing you do is replace the winch rope with something stronger, like a 2-inch strap designed for winch use (these are readily available on line).

My DSII came with a winch rope, which snapped due to old age partway through my first launch. I was leaning in to look at the winch at the time and the sudden release caused the handle to spin and smack me firmly on the upper lip. I bled all over the place and had to do some fast talking to keep my crew from dragging me to the local ER.

Also, it may still have the original equipment 3/32-inch shrouds and forestay. These are generally considered weak and should be replaced with 1/8-inch equivalents, which you can get from D&R marine.
Alan
 
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Re: Checking out a DSII this week

Postby GreenLake » Thu Aug 29, 2019 7:32 pm

Good point about the funky rope, Alan.

Ryan, if you like rope, you could use Amsteel, for example. I believe I'm using 3/16 and it's plenty strong (with a good safety factor) as well as reasonably UV and chafe resistant, because the fiber in those is Dyneema. Splicing Amsteel is super easy, so you can make an eyesplice around a thimble for the shackle. Use a bent wire, like a hairpin, to make the splice (forget about using "fids" or special equipment). Use a locked Brummel splice so it won't come open, as Dyneema is slippery (hence its chafe resistance).

3/16" Amsteel is rated at 4,900 pounds which would give you a safety factor of 7 for lifting your boat, and correspondingly more for winching it in. Your shackle would probably have a much lower working limit :)
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
GreenLake
 
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